The Eastern Samar Community Blog

The first and only community blog about the province of Eastern Samar, Philippines. With news, literature and a lot more.

How to Change Your Community

By • May 12th, 2010 • Category: Commentary

The election’s over and the results are out—at least the partial results that is. But even with these partial results, it’s already quite apparent who won in their respective positions, especially in the local elections.

No surprises here. They are still the same faces, but in different positions. Some have just been replaced by their spouses, thus extending their power to three more years.

We can be bitter all we want. We can tell the others that we don’t like how the results turned out. We can bash our opponents.

And still there will be no surprises in the end.

If it doesn’t work, look for another way.

There’s this line from one marketing guru who said that we cannot change how people think, but we can change the circumstances they live in.

If a person believes that he has to vote for the person who gave him money or a job, you cannot change that belief. Either you accept that or kill him.

People will have their reasons in voting for a ‘bad’ candidate. But if there’s one major reason I think I see, that would be the lack of empowerment among the majority of the voters, once again, in the local scene.

The lack of empowerment makes it easy for people to vote for people not because of their qualifications but because they gave them several hundreds or thousands of pesos and/or a job. “Utang na loob” is a big deal among us and that would be almost impossible to remove from our psyche. Or the probability of being axed from your job because the powers that be don’t like you makes it also difficult to stand up for what you believe is right.

But if these people are empowered, if they earn enough to have a decent meal, to have decent clothes, to send their children to school, and if they know they have the power to change their destiny, then I believe that things will change for the better.

Armed with the confidence of knowing what they can do, it will be a lot more difficult to buy their votes. It’s a simplistic way of putting it, but I’m only trying to illustrate a point here.

Change their circumstance, change their lives.

And you don’t have to be a government official to do that. You can do a lot of things to change your community through your talents alone.

On the other hand, you also can’t do anything if you all you do is complain. Present solutions instead.

The elections are over, but that’s not the end of everything. Rather, it should be the start of another phase of being vigilant. Let’s take it three years at a time. Let’s try to improve things three years at a time. Things will eventually add up.

So stop complaining. Change your community in whatever way you can. And never forget to be vigilant.

Share |
Tagged as: ,

is the blog's founder. He currently works as a freelance writer. Aside from that, he also maintains a writing blog, Write Like a Rock Star! He loves to read books and play music.
Email this author | All posts by

3 Responses »

  1. where can i see names of winners cong, gov and board members?

  2. Here you go Janet: http://electionresults.ibanangayon.ph/res_reg2600000.html

  3. Yup the elections are over and it’s time to move on. Not everybody will be satisfied (not a surprise, though!) but we cannot stop the world from spinning around. Only the future will be able to judge if we made the right and smart moves today. Really, we have to move on.

    A lot of people forget that it is not only through politics that we can serve others. It usually takes a big heart and noble intentions to influence and direct lives towards better circumstances. A government position rarely guarantees this. Perhaps this is a very good opportunity for those who never made it to show the people that, whether or not they were chosen, their raison d’etre extends beyond the election season. If all the candidates’ (winners and non-winners) intentions were true, perhaps this is the time to lay down their arms, shake hands and reconcile their goals (i.e. projects). After all, didn’t all of them claim that they just wanted the best for the people (several heads are better than one)? Finally, it’s time for a much needed peace in our country. I just wish that they will be brave enough to make the first step towards this process. And perhaps we’ll all see and feel that as the first good sign that we are all going the right direction.